A lot of media coverage today showing Sea Shepherd’s footage of protected minke whales being hunted by the Japanese whaling fleet, in the Southern Ocean’s ‘whale sanctuary’ - of all places. 

Sea Shepherd have returned to the Southern Ocean to continue their campaign of non-violent disruption to the whale hunts, ensuring as few whales as possible are caught. As long as the Australian and New Zealand governments’ reluctance to confront Japan continues, and the ‘international community’ does nothing, Sea Shepherd’s direct action approach is entirely necessary. 

This is the very reason we began NO RED SEAS.

Every payment for every download of NO RED SEAS vol. 1 goes direct to Sea Shepherd. And every day they are at sea and pursuing the Japanese fleet is another day that whales are protected.  

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jan/06/japanese-whaling-fleet—minke-whales-southern-ocean

My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.   My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.  

My favourite ten photos taken in Burma / Myanmar, February 2013.  

Cambodia is truly fucked up in many ways (with good reason). In a country where human kindness is in desperately short supply, this scene was even more touching. A group of wild dogs on the beach in Koh Rong had adopted a pig into their pack. The dogs ran and splashed and play-fought on the beach - and so did the pig. They even made allowance for his being slower and less agile. Happy, accepted beach-dog-pig; if only humans could do the same.   Cambodia is truly fucked up in many ways (with good reason). In a country where human kindness is in desperately short supply, this scene was even more touching. A group of wild dogs on the beach in Koh Rong had adopted a pig into their pack. The dogs ran and splashed and play-fought on the beach - and so did the pig. They even made allowance for his being slower and less agile. Happy, accepted beach-dog-pig; if only humans could do the same.   Cambodia is truly fucked up in many ways (with good reason). In a country where human kindness is in desperately short supply, this scene was even more touching. A group of wild dogs on the beach in Koh Rong had adopted a pig into their pack. The dogs ran and splashed and play-fought on the beach - and so did the pig. They even made allowance for his being slower and less agile. Happy, accepted beach-dog-pig; if only humans could do the same.  

Cambodia is truly fucked up in many ways (with good reason). In a country where human kindness is in desperately short supply, this scene was even more touching. A group of wild dogs on the beach in Koh Rong had adopted a pig into their pack. The dogs ran and splashed and play-fought on the beach - and so did the pig. They even made allowance for his being slower and less agile. Happy, accepted beach-dog-pig; if only humans could do the same.  

'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).   'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).  

'Tree-root temples', Angokor Wat (the aerial roots of strangler figs in fact).  

odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film
The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.
The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.
Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 
source 1, 2

odditiesoflife:

A War Zone Through the Eyes of Infrared Film

The stark contrast - a surreal red landscape of ethereal beauty serving as the backdrop for a war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres and systematic sexual violence. Throughout 2012, Richard Mosse and his collaborators Trevor Tweeten and Ben Frost traveled through the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, infiltrating armed rebel groups and filming what they see. The resulting work is titled The Enclave, a new multi-media installation at the 55th International Art Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice, Italy) from June through November, 2013.

The Enclave is the culmination of Mosse’s attempt to rethink war photography. It is a search for more adequate strategies to represent a forgotten African tragedy in which, according to the International Rescue Committee, at least 5.4 million people have died of war-related causes in eastern Congo since 1998.

Mosse uses a discontinued military surveillance film in the art installation, a medium that registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, and was originally designed for camouflage detection. The resulting imagery, shot on 16mm infrared film by cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, renders the jungle war zone in a disorienting psychedelic palette of pink and red hues. 

source 1, 2

'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat.  'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat. 

'Tree-root temples' Angkor Wat. 

Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…) Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…) Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…) Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…) Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…) Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…)

Inside Bayon, Angkor Wat - more like being inside a giant brain than a temple. (My theory is that it is a temple to the pineal gland…)

Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion) Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion)

Faces of Bayon, Angkor Wat - the most cosmic place I’ve ever been (a monumental hymn to the pineal gland, in my opinion)

The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos.  The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos. 

The Mekong River was our almost-constant companion as we travelled through Laos. 

Early morning bus journey above the clouds, northern Laos. Early morning bus journey above the clouds, northern Laos. Early morning bus journey above the clouds, northern Laos. Early morning bus journey above the clouds, northern Laos.

Early morning bus journey above the clouds, northern Laos.